Defense Notices


All students and faculty are welcome to attend the final defense of EECS graduate students completing their M.S. or Ph.D. degrees. Defense notices for M.S./Ph.D. presentations for this year and several previous years are listed below in reverse chronological order.

Students who are nearing the completion of their M.S./Ph.D. research should schedule their final defenses through the EECS graduate office at least THREE WEEKS PRIOR to their presentation date so that there is time to complete the degree requirements check, and post the presentation announcement online.

Upcoming Defense Notices

Mohammed Atif Siddiqui

Understanding Soccer Through Data Science

When & Where:


Learned Hall, Room 2133

Committee Members:

Zijun Yao, Chair
Tamzidul Hoque
Hongyang Sun


Abstract

Data science is revolutionizing the world of sports by uncovering hidden patterns and providing profound insights that enhance performance, strategy, and decision-making. This project, "Understanding Soccer Through Data Science," exemplifies the transformative power of data analytics in sports. By leveraging Graph Neural Networks (GNNs), this project delves deep into the intricate passing dynamics within soccer teams. 

A key innovation of this project is the development of a novel metric called PassNetScore, which aims to contextualize and provide meaningful insights into passing networks—a popular application of graph network theory in soccer. Utilizing the Statsbomb Event Data, which captures every event during a soccer match, including passes, shots, fouls, and substitutions, this project constructs detailed passing network graphs. Each player is represented as a node, and each pass as an edge, creating a comprehensive representation of team interactions on the pitch. The project harnesses the power of Spektral, a Python library for graph deep learning, to build and analyze these graphs. Key node features include players' average positions, total passes and expected threat of passes, while edges encapsulate the passing interactions and pass counts. 

The project explores two distinct models to calculate PassNetScore through predicting match outcomes. The first model is a basic GNN that employs a binary adjacency matrix to represent the presence or absence of passes between players. This model captures the fundamental structure of passing networks, highlighting key players and connections within the team. There are three variations of this model, each building on the binary model by adding new features to nodes or edges. The second model integrates GNN with Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) networks to account for temporal dependencies in passing sequences. This advanced model provides deeper insights into how passing patterns evolve over time and how these dynamics impact match outcomes. To evaluate the effectiveness of these models, a suite of graph theory metrics is employed. These metrics illuminate the dynamics of team play and the influence of individual players, offering a comprehensive assessment of the PassNet Score metric. 

Through this innovative approach, the project demonstrates the powerful application of GNNs in sports analytics and offers a novel metric for evaluating passing networks based on match outcomes. This project paves the way for new strategies and insights that could revolutionize how teams analyze and improve their gameplay, showcasing the profound impact of data science in sports.

 


Amalu George

Enhancing the Robustness of Bloom Filters by Introducing Dynamicity

When & Where:


Zoom Defense, please email jgrisafe@ku.edu for defense link.

Committee Members:

Sumaiya Shomaji, Chair
Hongyang Sun
Han Wang


Abstract

A Bloom Filter (BF) is a compact and space-efficient data structure that efficiently handles membership queries on infinite streams with numerous unique items. They are probabilistic data structures and allow false positives to avail the compactness. While querying for an item’s membership in the structure, if it returns true, the item might or might not be present in the stream, but a false response guarantees the item's absence. Bloom filters are widely used in real-world applications such as networking, databases, web applications, email spam filtering, biometric systems, security, cloud computing, and distributed systems due to their space-efficient and time-efficient properties. Bloom filters offer several advantages, particularly in storage compression and time-efficient data lookup. Additionally, the use of hashing ensures data security, i.e., if the BF is accessed by an unauthorized entity, no enrolled data can be reversed or traced back to the original content. In summary, BFs are powerful structures for storing data in a storage-efficient approach with low time complexity and high security. However, a disadvantage of the traditional Bloom filters is, they do not support dynamic operations, such as adding or deleting elements. Therefore, in this project, the idea of a Dynamic Bloom Filter has been demonstrated that offers the dynamicity feature that allows the addition or deletion of items. By integrating dynamic capabilities into Standard Bloom filters, their functionality, and robustness are enhanced, making them more suitable for several applications. For example, in a perpetual inventory system, inventory records are constantly updated after every inventory-related transaction, such as sales, purchases, or returns. In banking, dynamic data changes throughout the course of transactions. In the healthcare domain, hospitals can dynamically update and delete patients' medical histories.


Asadullah Khan

A Triad of Approaches for PCB Component Segmentation and Classification using U-Net, SAM, and Detectron2

When & Where:


Zoom Defense, please email jgrisafe@ku.edu for defense link.

Committee Members:

Sumaiya Shomaji, Chair
Tamzidul Hoque
Hongyang Sun


Abstract

The segmentation and classification of Printed Circuit Board (PCB) components offer multifaceted applications- primarily design validation, assembly verification, quality control optimization, and enhanced recycling processes. However, this field of study presents numerous challenges, mainly stemming from the heterogeneity of PCB component morphology and dimensionality, variations in packaging methodologies for functionally equivalent components, and limitations in the availability of image data. 

This study proposes a triad of approaches consisting of two segmentation-based and a classification-based architecture for PCB component detection. The first segmentation approach introduces an enhanced U-Net architecture with a custom loss function for improved multi-scale classification and segmentation accuracy. The second segmentation method leverages transfer learning, utilizing the Segment Anything Model (SAM) developed by Meta’s FAIR lab for both segmentation and classification. Lastly, Detectron2 with a ResNeXt-101 backbone, enhanced by Feature Pyramid Network (FPN), Region Proposal Network (RPN), and Region of Interest (ROI) Align has been proposed for multi-scale detection. The proposed methods are implemented on the FPIC dataset to detect the most commonly appearing components (resistor, capacitor, integrated circuit, LED, and button) in PCB. The first method outperforms existing state-of-the-art networks without pre-training, achieving a DICE score of 94.05%, an IoU score of 91.17%, and an accuracy of 94.90%. On the other hand, the second one surpasses both the previous state-of-the-art network and U-net in segmentation, attaining a DICE score of 97.08%, an IoU score of 93.95%, and an accuracy of 96.34%. Finally, the third one, being the first transfer learning-based approach to perform individual component classification on PCBs, achieves an average precision of 89.88%. Thus, the proposed triad of approaches will play a promising role in enhancing the robustness and accuracy of PCB quality assurance techniques.


Past Defense Notices

Dates

Zeyan Liu

On the Security of Modern AI: Backdoors, Robustness, and Detectability

When & Where:


Nichols Hall, Room 246 (Executive Conference Room)

Committee Members:

Bo Luo, Chair
Alex Bardas
Fengjun Li
Zijun Yao
John Symons

Abstract

The rapid development of AI has significantly impacted security and privacy, introducing both new cyber-attacks targeting AI models and challenges related to responsible use. As AI models become more widely adopted in real-world applications, attackers exploit adversarially altered samples to manipulate their behaviors and decisions. Simultaneously, the use of generative AI, like ChatGPT, has sparked debates about the integrity of AI-generated content.

In this dissertation, we investigate the security of modern AI systems and the detectability of AI-related threats, focusing on stealthy AI attacks and responsible AI use in academia. First, we reevaluate the stealthiness of 20 state-of-the-art attacks on six benchmark datasets, using 24 image quality metrics and over 30,000 user annotations. Our findings reveal that most attacks introduce noticeable perturbations, failing to remain stealthy. Motivated by this, we propose a novel model-poisoning neural Trojan, LoneNeuron, which minimally modifies the host neural network by adding a single neuron after the first convolution layer. LoneNeuron responds to feature-domain patterns that transform into invisible, sample-specific, and polymorphic pixel-domain watermarks, achieving a 100% attack success rate without compromising main task performance and enhancing stealth and detection resistance. Additionally, we examine the detectability of ChatGPT-generated content in academic writing. Presenting GPABench2, a dataset of over 2.8 million abstracts across various disciplines, we assess existing detection tools and challenges faced by over 240 evaluators. We also develop CheckGPT, a detection framework consisting of an attentive Bi-LSTM and a representation module, to capture subtle semantic and linguistic patterns in ChatGPT-generated text. Extensive experiments validate CheckGPT’s high applicability, transferability, and robustness.


Abhishek Doodgaon

Photorealistic Synthetic Data Generation for Deep Learning-based Structural Health Monitoring of Concrete Dams

When & Where:


LEEP2, Room 1415A

Committee Members:

Zijun Yao, Chair
Caroline Bennett
Prasad Kulkarni
Remy Lequesne

Abstract

Regular inspections are crucial for identifying and assessing damage in concrete dams, including a wide range of damage states. Manual inspections of dams are often constrained by cost, time, safety, and inaccessibility. Automating dam inspections using artificial intelligence has the potential to improve the efficiency and accuracy of data analysis. Computer vision and deep learning models have proven effective in detecting a variety of damage features using images, but their success relies on the availability of high-quality and diverse training data. This is because supervised learning, a common machine-learning approach for classification problems, uses labeled examples, in which each training data point includes features (damage images) and a corresponding label (pixel annotation). Unfortunately, public datasets of annotated images of concrete dam surfaces are scarce and inconsistent in quality, quantity, and representation.

To address this challenge, we present a novel approach that involves synthesizing a realistic environment using a 3D model of a dam. By overlaying this model with synthetically created photorealistic damage textures, we can render images to generate large and realistic datasets with high-fidelity annotations. Our pipeline uses NX and Blender for 3D model generation and assembly, Substance 3D Designer and Substance Automation Toolkit for texture synthesis and automation, and Unreal Engine 5 for creating a realistic environment and rendering images. This generated synthetic data is then used to train deep learning models in the subsequent steps. The proposed approach offers several advantages. First, it allows generation of large quantities of data that are essential for training accurate deep learning models. Second, the texture synthesis ensures generation of high-fidelity ground truths (annotations) that are crucial for making accurate detections. Lastly, the automation capabilities of the software applications used in this process provides flexibility to generate data with varied textures elements, colors, lighting conditions, and image quality overcoming the constraints of time. Thus, the proposed approach can improve the automation of dam inspection by improving the quality and quantity of training data.


Sana Awan

Towards Robust and Privacy-preserving Federated Learning

When & Where:


Zoom Defense, please email jgrisafe@ku.edu for defense link.

Committee Members:

Fengjun Li, Chair
Alex Bardas
Cuncong Zhong
Mei Liu
Haiyang Chao

Abstract

Machine Learning (ML) has revolutionized various fields, from disease prediction to credit risk evaluation, by harnessing abundant data scattered across diverse sources. However, transporting data to a trusted server for centralized ML model training is not only costly but also raises privacy concerns, particularly with legislative standards like HIPAA in place. In response to these challenges, Federated Learning (FL) has emerged as a promising solution. FL involves training a collaborative model across a network of clients, each retaining its own private data. By conducting training locally on the participating clients, this approach eliminates the need to transfer entire training datasets while harnessing their computation capabilities. However, FL introduces unique privacy risks, security concerns, and robustness challenges. Firstly, FL is susceptible to malicious actors who may tamper with local data, manipulate the local training process, or intercept the shared model or gradients to implant backdoors that affect the robustness of the joint model. Secondly, due to the statistical and system heterogeneity within FL, substantial differences exist between the distribution of each local dataset and the global distribution, causing clients’ local objectives to deviate greatly from the global optima, resulting in a drift in local updates. Addressing such vulnerabilities and challenges is crucial before deploying FL systems in critical infrastructures.

In this dissertation, we present a multi-pronged approach to address the privacy, security, and robustness challenges in FL. This involves designing innovative privacy protection mechanisms and robust aggregation schemes to counter attacks during the training process. To address the privacy risk due to model or gradient interception, we present the design of a reliable and accountable blockchain-enabled privacy-preserving federated learning (PPFL) framework which leverages homomorphic encryption to protect individual client updates. The blockchain is adopted to support provenance of model updates during training so that malformed or malicious updates can be identified and traced back to the source. 

We studied the challenges in FL due to heterogeneous data distributions and found that existing FL algorithms often suffer from slow and unstable convergence and are vulnerable to poisoning attacks, particularly in extreme non-independent and identically distributed (non-IID) settings. We propose a robust aggregation scheme, named CONTRA, to mitigate data poisoning attacks and ensure an accuracy guarantee even under attack. This defense strategy identifies malicious clients by evaluating the cosine similarity of their gradient contributions and subsequently removes them from FL training. Finally, we introduce FL-GMM, an algorithm designed to tackle data heterogeneity while prioritizing privacy. It iteratively constructs a personalized classifier for each client while aligning local-global feature representations. By aligning local distributions with global semantic information, FL-GMM minimizes the impact of data diversity. Moreover, FL-GMM enhances security by transmitting derived model parameters via secure multiparty computation, thereby avoiding vulnerabilities to reconstruction attacks observed in other approaches. 


Arin Dutta

Performance Analysis of Distributed Raman Amplification with Dual-Order Forward Pumping

When & Where:


Nichols Hall, Room 250 (Gemini Room)

Committee Members:

Rongqing Hui, Chair
Christopher Allen
Morteza Hashemi
Alessandro Salandrino
Hui Zhao

Abstract

As internet services like high-definition videos, cloud computing, and artificial intelligence keep growing, optical networks need to keep up with the demand for more capacity. Optical amplifiers play a crucial role in offsetting fiber loss and enabling long-distance wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) transmission in high-capacity systems. Various methods have been proposed to enhance the capacity and reach of fiber communication systems, including advanced modulation formats, dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) over ultra-wide bands, space-division multiplexing, and high-performance digital signal processing (DSP) technologies. To sustain higher data rates while maximizing the spectral efficiency of multi-level modulated signals, a higher Optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) is necessary. Despite advancements in coherent optical communication systems, the spectral efficiency of multi-level modulated signals is ultimately constrained by fiber nonlinearity. Raman amplification is an attractive solution for wide-band amplification with low noise figures in multi-band systems. Distributed Raman Amplification (DRA) has been deployed in recent high-capacity transmission experiments to achieve a relatively flat signal power distribution along the optical path and offers the unique advantage of using conventional low-loss silica fibers as the gain medium, effectively transforming passive optical fibers into active or amplifying waveguides. Additionally, DRA provides gain at any wavelength by selecting the appropriate pump wavelength, enabling operation in signal bands outside the Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) bands. Forward (FW) Raman pumping in DRA can be adopted to further improve the DRA performance as it is more efficient in OSNR improvement because the optical noise is generated near the beginning of the fiber span and attenuated along the fiber. Dual-order FW pumping helps to reduce the non-linear effect of the optical signal and improves OSNR by more uniformly distributing the Raman gain along the transmission span. The major concern with Forward Distributed Raman Amplification (FW DRA) is the fluctuation in pump power, known as relative intensity noise (RIN), which transfers from the pump laser to both the intensity and phase of the transmitted optical signal as they propagate in the same direction. Additionally, another concern of FW DRA is the rise in signal optical power near the start of the fiber span, leading to an increase in the Kerr-effect-induced non-linear phase shift of the signal. These factors, including RIN transfer-induced noise and non-linear noise, contribute to the degradation of the system performance in FW DRA systems at the receiver. As the performance of DRA with backward pumping is well understood with a relatively low impact of RIN transfer, our study is focused on the FW pumping scheme. Our research is intended to provide a comprehensive analysis of the system performance impact of dual-order FW Raman pumping, including signal intensity and phase noise induced by the RINs of both the 1st and the 2nd order pump lasers, as well as the impacts of linear and nonlinear noise. The efficiencies of pump RIN to signal intensity and phase noise transfer are theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified by applying a shallow intensity modulation to the pump laser to mimic the RIN. The results indicate that the efficiency of the 2nd order pump RIN to signal phase noise transfer can be more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than that from the 1st order pump. Then the performance of the dual-order FW Raman configurations is compared with that of single-order Raman pumping to understand the trade-offs of system parameters. The nonlinear interference (NLI) noise is analyzed to study the overall OSNR improvement when employing a 2nd order Raman pump. Finally, a DWDM system with 16-QAM modulation is used as an example to investigate the benefit of DRA with dual order Raman pumping and with different pump RIN levels. We also consider a DRA system using a 1st order incoherent pump together with a 2nd order coherent pump. Although dual-order FW pumping corresponds to a slight increase of linear amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) compared to using only a 1st order pump, its major advantage comes from the reduction of nonlinear interference noise in a DWDM system. Because the RIN of the 2nd order pump has much higher impact than that of the 1st order pump, there should be more stringent requirement on the RIN of the 2nd order pump laser when dual order FW pumping scheme is used for DRA for efficient fiber-optic communication. Also, the result of system performance analysis reveals that higher baud rate systems, like those operating at 100Gbaud, are less affected by pump laser RIN due to the low-pass characteristics of the transfer of pump RIN to signal phase noise.


Babak Badnava

Joint Communication and Computation for Emerging Applications in Next Generation of Wireless Networks

When & Where:


Nichols Hall, Room 246 (Executive Conference Room)

Committee Members:

Morteza Hashemi, Chair
Victor Frost
Taejoon Kim
Prasad Kulkarni
Shawn Keshmiri

Abstract

Emerging applications in next-generation wireless networks are driving the need for innovative communication and computation systems. Notable examples include augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR), autonomous vehicles, and mobile edge computing, all of which demand significant computational and communication resources at the network edge. These demands place a strain on edge devices, which are often resource-constrained. In order to incorporate available communication and computation resources, while enhancing user experience, this PhD research is dedicated to developing joint communication and computation solutions for next generation wireless applications that could potentially operate in high frequencies such as millimeter wave (mmWave) bands.

In the first thrust of this study, we examine the problem of energy-constrained computation offloading to edge servers in a multi-user multi-channel wireless network. To develop a decentralized offloading policy for each user, we model the problem as a partially observable Markov decision problem (POMDP). Leveraging bandit learning methods, we introduce a decentralized task offloading solution, where edge users offload their computation tasks to a nearby edge server using a selected communication channel. The proposed framework aims to meet user's requirements, such as task completion deadline and computation throughput (i.e., the rate at which computational results are produced).

The second thrust of the study emphasizes user-driven requirements for these resource-intensive applications, specifically the Quality of Experience (QoE) in 2D and 3D video streaming. Given the unique characteristics of mmWave networks, we develop a beam alignment and buffer predictive multi-user scheduling algorithm for 2D video streaming applications. This scheduling algorithm balances the trade-off between beam alignment overhead and playback buffer levels for optimal resource allocation across users. Next, we extend our investigation and develop a joint rate adaptation and computation distribution algorithm for 3D video streaming in mmWave-based VR systems. Our proposed framework balances the trade-off between communication and computation resource allocation to enhance the users’ QoE. Our numerical results using real-world mmWave traces and 3D video dataset, show promising improvements in terms of video quality, rebuffering time, and quality variation perceived by users. 


Arman Ghasemi

Task-Oriented Communication and Distributed Control in Smart Grids with Time-Series Forecasting

When & Where:


Nichols Hall, Room 246 (Executive Conference Room)

Committee Members:

Morteza Hashemi, Chair
Alexandru Bardas
Taejoon Kim
Prasad Kulkarni
Zsolt Talata

Abstract

Smart grids face challenges in maintaining the balance between generation and consumption at the residential and grid scales with the integration of renewable energy resources. Decentralized, dynamic, and distributed control algorithms are necessary for smart grids to function effectively. The inherent variability and uncertainty of renewables, especially wind and solar energy, complicate the deployment of distributed control algorithms in smart grids. In addition, smart grid systems must handle real-time data collected from interconnected devices and sensors while maintaining reliable and secure communication regardless of network failures. To address these challenges, our research models the integration of renewable energy resources into the smart grid and evaluates how predictive analytics can improve distributed control and energy management, while recognizing the limitations of communication channels and networks.

In the first thrust of this research, we develop a model of a smart grid with renewable energy integration and evaluate how forecasting affects distributed control and energy management. In particular, we investigate how contextual weather information and renewable energy time-series forecasting affect smart grid energy management. In addition to modeling the smart grid system and integrating renewable energy resources, we further explore the use of deep learning methods, such as the Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) and Transformer models, for time-series forecasting. Time-series forecasting techniques are applied within Reinforcement Learning (RL) frameworks to enhance decision-making processes.

In the second thrust, we note that data collection and sharing across the smart grids require considering the impact of network and communication channel limitations in our forecasting models. As renewable energy sources and advanced sensors are integrated into smart grids, communication channels on wireless networks are overflowed with data, requiring a shift from transmitting raw data to processing only useful information to maximize efficiency and reliability. To this end, we develop a task-oriented communication model that integrates data compression and the effects of data packet queuing with considering limitation of communication channels, within a remote time-series forecasting framework. Furthermore, we jointly integrate data compression technique with age of information metric to enhance both relevance and timeliness of data used in time-series forecasting.


Neel Patel

Near-Memory Acceleration of Compressed Far Memory

When & Where:


Nichols Hall, Room 250 (Gemini Room)

Committee Members:

Mohammad Alian, Chair
David Johnson
Prasad Kulkarni


Abstract

DRAM constitutes over 50% of server cost and 75% of the embodied carbon footprint of a server. To mitigate DRAM cost, far memory architectures have emerged. They can be separated into two broad categories: software-defined far memory (SFM) and disaggregated far memory (DFM). In this work, we compare the cost of SFM and DFM in terms of their required capital investment, operational expense, and carbon footprint. We show that, for applications whose data sets are compressible and have predictable memory access patterns, it takes several years for a DFM to break even with an equivalent capacity SFM in terms of cost and sustainability. We then introduce XFM, a near-memory accelerated SFM architecture, which exploits the coldness of data during SFM-initiated swap ins and outs. XFM leverages refresh cycles to seamlessly switch the access control of DRAM between the CPU and near-memory accelerator. XFM parallelizes near-memory accelerator accesses with row refreshes and removes the memory interference caused by SFM swap ins and outs. We modify an open source far memory implementation to implement a full-stack, user-level XFM. Our experimental results use a combination of an FPGA implementation, simulation, and analytical modeling to show that XFM eliminates memory bandwidth utilization when performing compression and decompression operations with SFMs of capacities up to 1TB. The memory and cache utilization reductions translate to 5∼27% improvement in the combined performance of co-running applications.


Dang Qua Nguyen

Hybrid Precoding Optimization and Private Federated Learning for Future Wireless Systems

When & Where:


Nichols Hall, Room 246 (Executive Conference Room)

Committee Members:

Taejoon Kim, Chair
Morteza Hashemi
Erik Perrins
Zijun Yao
KC Kong

Abstract

This PhD research addresses two challenges in future wireless systems: hybrid precoder design for sub-Terahertz (sub-THz) massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communications and private federated learning (FL) over wireless channels. The first part of the research introduces a novel hybrid precoding framework that combines true-time delay (TTD) and phase shifters (PS) precoders to counteract the beam squint effect - a significant challenge in sub-THz massive MIMO systems that leads to considerable loss in array gain. Our research presents a novel joint optimization framework for the TTD and PS precoder design, incorporating realistic time delay constraints for each TTD device. We first derive a lower bound on the achievable rate of the system and show that, in the asymptotic regime, the optimal analog precoder that fully compensates for the beam squint is equivalent to the one that maximizes this lower bound. Unlike previous methods, our framework does not rely on the unbounded time delay assumption and optimizes the TTD and PS values jointly to cope with the practical limitations. Furthermore, we determine the minimum number of TTD devices needed to reach a target array gain using our proposed approach. Simulations validate that the proposed approach demonstrates performance enhancement, ensures array gain, and achieves computational efficiency. In the second part, the research devises a differentially private FL algorithm that employs time-varying noise perturbation and optimizes transmit power to counteract privacy risks, particularly those stemming from engineering-inversion attacks. This method harnesses inherent wireless channel noise to strike a balance between privacy protection and learning utility. By strategically designing noise perturbation and power control, our approach not only safeguards user privacy but also upholds the quality of the learned FL model. Additionally, the number of FL iterations is optimized by minimizing the upper bound on the learning error. We conduct simulations to showcase the effectiveness of our approach in terms of DP guarantee and learning utility.


Durga Venkata Suraj Tedla

Block chain based inter organization file sharing system

When & Where:


Eaton Hall, Room 2001B

Committee Members:

David Johnson, Chair
Drew Davidson
Sankha Guria


Abstract

A coalition of companies collaborates collectively and shares information to improve their operations together. Distributed trust and transparency cannot be obtained with centralized file-sharing platforms. File sharing may be done transparently and securely with blockchain technology. This project suggests an inter-organizational secure file-sharing system based on blockchain technology. The group can use it to securely share files in a distributed manner. The creation of smart contracts and the configuration of blockchain networks are carried out by Hyperledger Fabric, an enterprise blockchain platform. Distributed file storage is accomplished through the usage of the Inter Planetary File System (IPFS). The workflow for file-sharing and identity management procedures is provided in the paper. Using blockchain technology, the recommended approach enables a group of businesses to share files with availability, integrity, and confidentiality. The suggested method uses blockchain to enable safe file exchange amongst a group of enterprises. It offers shared file availability, confidentiality, and integrity. It guarantees complete file encryption. The blockchain provides tamper-resistant storage for the shared file's content ID. On the distributed storage and blockchain ledger, respectively, the encrypted file and file metadata are stored.


Sai Narendra Koganti

Real-time Object Detection for Safer Driving Experience in Urban Environment: Leveraging YOLO Algorithm

When & Where:


Nichols Hall, Room 250 (Gemini Room)

Committee Members:

Sumaiya Shomaji, Chair
David Johnson
Prasad Kulkarni


Abstract

This project offers a hands-on investigation of object identification utilizing the YOLO method, Python, and OpenCV. It begins by explaining the YOLO architecture, focusing on the single-stage detection process for bounding box prediction and class probability calculation. The setup phase includes library installation and model configuration, resulting in a smooth implementation procedure. Using OpenCV, the project includes preparatory processes required for object detection in images. The YOLO model is seamlessly integrated into the OpenCV framework, enabling object detection. Post-processing techniques, such as non-maximum suppression, are used to modify detection results and improve accuracy. Visualizations, such as bounding boxes and labels, are used to help interpret the discovered items. The project finishes by investigating potential expansions and optimizations, such as custom dataset training and deployment on edge devices, opening up new paths for further investigation and development. This project provides developers with the tools and knowledge they need to build effective object detection systems for a wide range of applications, from surveillance and security to autonomous vehicles and augmented reality.