Communication Systems

EECS Professor Erik Perrins and his students are developing two-way communication systems for Smart Grids that will utilize existing wireless services.

EECS researchers integrate leading-edge research with practical implementation across a wide range of challenging communications systems problems. Current research efforts include delay-sensitive, energy-efficient wireless communication, multi-user communication systems and networks, advanced modulation techniques, channel coding, and synchronization. Building on a long and storied history in communication innovation, EECS researchers are developing the future Internet, mobile apps, optical sensors, RFID tags, and spectrum measurement and management techniques.

Associated Disciplines

 

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Associated Programs

Associated Faculty

Professor
785-864-7326
Eaton Hall, room 3034

Primary Research Interests

  • Adaptive Signal Processing for Radar and Communications
  • Array Processing
  • Interference Cancellation
  • Waveform Diversity/Design for Physical Systems
  • Spectrum Engineering
Deane E. Acker Distinguished Professor
785-864-8808
2048 Eaton Hall

Primary Research Interests

  • High-Performance Networks
  • Mobile Networking and Wireless Systems
  • Pervasive Computing Systems
  • System Implementations
Dan F. Servey Distinguished Professor, Department Chair
785-864-4486
2001G Eaton Hall

Primary Research Interests

  • Communication Systems and Networks
  • Networking Simulation and Modeling
  • Wireless Systems
Professor
785-864-8814
3026 Eaton Hall

Primary Research Interests

  • Optical/RF Measurement and Biosensors
  • Novel Photonic Devices
  • Optical Communication Systems
Professor
785-864-7370
2054 Eaton Hall

Primary Research Interests

  • Digital Communication Theory
  • Advanced Modulation Techniques
  • Channel Coding
  • Synchronization
  • Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Communications
Professor
785-864-8815
3048 Eaton Hall

Primary Research Interests

  • Software Radio Systems
  • Spread Spectrum and Military Communication Systems
  • Radio and Radar Signal Processing
  • DSP Applications in Acoustics and Radio Signals
  • Wireless Communication Systems
Professor
785-864-8846
3036 Eaton Hall

Primary Research Interests

  • Computer networks and communication; Network science, simulation, and analysis
  • Future Internet architecture, design, and topology
  • Resilient, survivable, and disruption tolerant networks
  • Mobile wireless networks and MANET routing
  • Disruption and delay tolerant end-to-end transport

Associated Facilities

  • Optical spectrum analyzer
  • 50GHz microwave network analyzer
  • 40GHz digital oscilloscope
  • Tunable laser sources and optical filters
  • 40Gb/s and 12 Gb/s BERTs
  • Electro-optic modulators, WDM multiplexers, demultiplexers
  • High-speed photodetectors
  • Commercial WDM systems
  • High-speed digital T/R rooftop antenna
  • 360 km of fiber installed for systems-level testing
  • DSP rapid prototyping system
  • Circuit board fabrication facility
  • Logic analyzers
  • Network analyzers
  • Spectrum analyzers, oscilloscopes, and function generators
  • Prototype PC board fabrication tools
  • RF signal generators
  • Communications link simulator- Simulink
  • Variety of DSP and EM design tools

Program Objectives

  • Understand fundamental principles and underlying technologies of communication systems.
  • Understand how to apply communication theory principles in the design and analysis of communication systems.
  • Understand how to realize communication systems, including simulation and efficient implementation.

Core Coursework (MS)

EECS 861 Random Signals and Noise
Fundamental concepts in random variables, random process models, power spectral density. Application of random process models in the analysis and design of signal processing systems, communication systems and networks. Emphasis on signal detection, estimation, and analysis of queues. This course is a prerequisite for most of the graduate level courses in radar signal processing, communication systems and networks. Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in probability and statistics, and signal processing. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 862 Principles of Digital Communication Systems
A study of communication systems using noisy channels. Principal topics are: information and channel capacity, baseband data transmission, digital carrier modulation, error control coding, and digital transmission of analog signals. The course includes a laboratory/computer aided design component integrated into the study of digital communication systems. Prerequisite: EECS 562. Corequisite: EECS 861. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 844 Adaptive Signal Processing
This course presents the theory and application of adaptive signal processing. Topics include adaptive filtering, mathematics for advanced signal processing, cost function modeling and optimization, signal processing algorithms for optimum filtering, array processing, linear prediction, interference cancellation, power spectrum estimation, steepest descent, and iterative algorithms. Prerequisite: Background in fundamental signal processing (such as EECS 644.) Corequisite: EECS 861. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 865 Wireless Communication Systems
The theory and practice of the engineering of wireless telecommunication systems. Topics include cellular principles, mobile radio propagation (including indoor and outdoor channels), radio link calculations, fading (including Rayleigh, Rician, and other models), packet radio, equalization, diversity, error correction coding, spread spectrum, multiple access techniques (including time, frequency, and code), and wireless networking. Current topics of interest will be covered. Prerequisite: Corequisite: EECS 861. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

Note: Students must take either EECS 865 or EECS 728 to fulfill their core coursework requirement.

Elective Coursework (MS)

EECS 622 Microwave and Radio Transmission Systems
Introduction to radio transmission systems. Topics include radio transmitter and receiver design, radiowave propagation phenomenology, antenna performance and basic design, and signal detection in the presence of noise. Students will design radio systems to meet specified performance measure. Prerequisite: Corequisite: EECS 420 and EECS 461. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 628 Fiber Optic Communication Systems
Description and analysis of the key components in optical communication systems. Topics covered include quantum sources, fiber cable propagation and dispersion characteristics, receiver characteristics, and system gain considerations. Prerequisite: EECS 220 and PHSX 313 or equivalent and upper-level EECS eligibility. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hui, Rongqing
MWF 03:00-03:50 PM LEA 2133 - LAWRENCE
3 59869
EECS 721 Antennas
Gain, Pattern, and Impedance concepts for antennas. Linear, loop, helical, and aperture antennas (arrays, reflectors, and lenses). Cylindrical and biconical antenna theory. Prerequisite: EECS 360 and EECS 420, or EECS 720, or permission of the instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Stiles, James
MWF 02:00-02:50 PM LEA 3150 - LAWRENCE
3 65768
LEC Stiles, James
MWF 02:00-02:50 PM KS-ST OLTH - EDWARDS
3 68524
EECS 723 Microwave Engineering
Survey of microwave systems, techniques, and hardware. Guided-wave theory, microwave network theory, active and passive microwave components. Prerequisite: EECS 420. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Stiles, James
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM LEA 3150 - LAWRENCE
3 55345
LEC Stiles, James
MWF 09:00-09:50 AM KS-ST OLTH - EDWARDS
3 59779
EECS 728 Fiber-optic Measurement and Sensors
The course will focus on fundamental theory and various methods and applications of fiber-optic measurements and sensors. Topics include: optical power and loss measurements, optical spectrum analysis, wavelength measurements, polarization measurements, dispersion measurements, PMD measurements, optical amplifier characterization, OTDR, optical components characterization and industrial applications of fiber-optic sensors. Prerequisite: EECS 628 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 744 Communications and Radar Digital Signal Processing
The application of DSP techniques to specialized communications and radar signal processing subsystems. Topics include A-D converters, specialized digital filters, software receiver systems, adaptive subsystems and timing. Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in DSP such as EECS 644. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Prescott, Glenn
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM LEA 3150 - LAWRENCE
3 62082
LEC Prescott, Glenn
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM KS-ST OLTH - EDWARDS
3 62850
EECS 745 Implementation of Networks
EECS 745 is a laboratory-focused implementation of networks. Topics include direct link networks (encoding, framing, error detection, reliable transmission, SONET, FDDL, network adapters, Ethernet, 802.11 wireless networks); packet and cell switching (ATM, switching hardware, bridges and extended LANs); internetworking (Internet concepts, IPv6, multicast, naming/DNS); end-to-end protocols (UDP, TCP, APIs and sockets, RPCs, performance); end-to-end data (presentation formatting, data compression, security); congestion control (queuing disciplines, TCP congestion control and congestion avoidance); high-speed networking (issues, services, experiences); voice over IP (peer-to-peer calling, call managers, call signalling, PBX and call attendant functionality). Prerequisite: EECS 563 or EECS 780. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 769 Information Theory
Information theory is the science of operations on data such as compression, storage, and communication. It is one of the few scientific fields fortunate enough to have an identifiable beginning - Claude Shannon's 1948 paper. The main topics of mutual information, entropy, and relative entropy are essential for students, researchers, and practitioners in such diverse fields as communications, data compression, statistical signal processing, neuroscience, and machine learning. The topics covered in this course include mathematical definitions and properties of information, mutual information, source coding theorem, lossless compression of data, optimal lossless coding, noisy communication channels, channel coding theorem, the source channel separation theorem, multiple access channels, broadcast channels, Gaussian noise, time-varying channels, and network information theory. Prerequisite: EECS 461 or an equivalent undergraduate probability course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 780 Communication Networks
Comprehensive in-depth coverage to communication networks with emphasis on the Internet and the PSTN (wired and wireless, and IoT-Internet of Things). Extensive coverage of protocols and algorithms will be presented at all levels, including: social networking, overlay networks, client/server and peer-to-peer applications; session control; transport protocols, the end-to-end arguments and end-to-end congestion control; network architecture, forwarding, routing, signaling, addressing, and traffic management, programmable and software-defined networks (SDN); quality of service, queuing and multimedia applications; LAN architecture, link protocols, access networks and MAC algorithms; physical media characteristics and coding; network security and information assurance; network management. (Same as IT 780.) Prerequisite: EECS 563 or equivalent or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 828 Advanced Fiber-Optic Communications
An advanced course in fiber-optic communications. The course will focus on various important aspects and applications of modern fiber-optic communications, ranging from photonic devices to systems and networks. Topics include: advanced semiconductor laser devices, external optical modulators, optical amplifiers, optical fiber nonlinearities and their impact in WDM and TDM optical systems, polarization effect in fiber-optic systems, optical receivers and high-speed optical system performance evaluation, optical solution systems, lightwave analog video transmission, SONET & ATM optical networking, and advanced multi-access lightwave networks. Prerequisite: EECS 628 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 863 Network Analysis, Simulation, and Measurements
Prediction of communication network performance using analysis, simulation, and measurement. Topics include: an introduction to queueing theory, application of theory to prediction of communication network and protocol performance, and analysis of scheduling mechanisms. Modeling communication networks using analytic and simulation approaches, model verification and validation through analysis and measurement, and deriving statistically significant results. Analysis, simulation, and measurement tools will be discussed. Prerequisite: EECS 461 or MATH 526, and EECS 563 or EECS 780. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 869 Error Control Coding
A study of communication channels and the coding problem. An introduction to finite fields and linear block codes such as cyclic, Hamming, Golay, BCH, and Reed-Solomon. Convolutional codes and the Viberbi algorithm are also covered. Other topics include trellis coded modulation, iterative (turbo) codes, LDPC codes. Prerequisite: EECS: 562 or equivalent. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 881 High-Performance Networking
Comprehensive coverage of the discipline of high-bandwidth low-latency networks and communication, including high bandwidth-×-delay products, with an emphasis on principles, architecture, protocols, and system design. Topics include high-performance network architecture, control, and signaling; high-speed wired, optical, and wireless links; fast packet, IP, and optical switching; IP lookup, classification, and scheduling; network processors, end system design and protocol optimization, network interfaces; storage networks; data-center networks, end-to-end protocols, mechanisms, and optimizations; high-bandwidth low-latency applications and cloud computing. Principles will be illustrated with many leading-edge and emerging protocols and architectures. Prerequisite: EECS 563 or EECS 780, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 882 Mobile Wireless Networking
Comprehensive coverage of the disciplines of mobile and wireless networking, with an emphasis on architecture and protocols. Topics include cellular telephony, MAC algorithms, wireless PANs, LANs, MANs, and WANs; wireless and mobile Internet; mobile ad hoc networking; mobility management, sensor networks; satellite networks; and ubiquitous computing. Prerequisite: EECS 563 or EECS 780, or permission of the instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
DIS Sterbenz, James
Tu 06:10-09:00 PM LEA 3150 - LAWRENCE
3 65749
LEC Sterbenz, James
Th 06:10-09:00 PM LEA 3150 - LAWRENCE
3 65750
EECS 888 Internet Routing Architectures
A detailed study of routing in IP networks. Topics include evolution of the Internet architecture, IP services and network characteristics, an overview of routing protocols, the details of common interior routing protocols and interdomain routing protocols, and the relationship between routing protocols and the implementation of policy. Issues will be illustrated through laboratories based on common routing platforms. Prerequisite: EECS 745. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 965 Detection and Estimation Theory
Detection of signals in the presence of noise and estimation of signal parameters. Narrowband signals, multiple observations, signal detectability and sequential detection. Theoretical structure and performance of the receiver. Prerequisite: EECS 861. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

EECS 983 Resilient and Survivable Networking
Graduate research seminar that provides an overview of the emerging field of resilient, survivable, disruption-tolerant, and challenged networks. These networks aim to remain operational and provide an acceptable level of service in the face of a number of challenges including: natural faults of network components; failures due to misconfiguration or operational errors; attacks against the network hardware, software, or protocol infrastructure; large-scale natural disasters; unpredictably long delay paths either due to length (e.g. satellite and interplanetary) or as a result of episodic connectivity; weak and episodic connectivity and asymmetry of wireless channels; high-mobility of nodes and subnetworks; unusual traffic load (e.g. flash crowds). Multi-level solutions that span all protocol layers, planes, and parts of the network will be systemically and systematically covered. In addition to lectures, students read and present summaries of research papers and execute a project. Prerequisite: EECS 780; previous experience in simulation desirable. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Sterbenz, James
F 09:00-11:30 AM EATN 1005C - LAWRENCE
3 69232
EECS 820 Advanced Electromagnetics
A theorem-based approach to solving Maxwell's equations for modeling electromagnetic problems encountered in microwave systems, antennas, scattering. Topics include waves, source modeling, Schelkunoff equivalence principle, scattered filed formulations, electromagnetic induction, reciprocity principles, Babinet's principle, and construction of solutions in various coordinate systems. Prerequisite: EECS 420. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

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